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Variegated Sun Fly

There are two variants of The Variegated Sun Fly registered on flypattern.org: one by Kelson and one by Pryce-Tannatt

Both of the variants have the same basic features: body of divided berlin wool, black front-hackle and a topping wing. Kelson calls for Macaw in tail and for horns, but here I use blue swan instead, not as stiff as Macaw, and not quite the color, but for these flies (that go into the fishing box) I wanted to use up some 2nd grade topping and try to tie up some quick and fishable patterns without the need for all the materials called for.

Tied on Partridge M2 #1/0

Kelson
Pryce-Tannatt

Jock Scott for fishing

For the 2019 season I’m tying up some smaller classics to go fishing with, first up is a Jock Scott on a Partridge M2 #1

To ensure it will hold up and fish without breaking up I have chosen to do a wool butt and reverse-hackled the black body hackle. The materials in the wing and body is also substituted and somewhat changed if you look at the original recipies: http://flypattern.org/search?s=jock%20scott

The wing is peacock, swan and turkey, the underwing is a brown and not white-tipped turkey, sides is just a single-strip of wood duck instead of a married section of wood duck and teal. All this is done to create a easy to tie pattern that has all the main parts of a Jock Scott in it, but at the same time doesn’t have a enormous amount of material in it.

Akroyd #8/0

A double-winged Akroyd tied on a massive #8/0 (close to #9/0) hook that I got the other day. To tie married wing patterns, or single-wing dee/spey on these massive hooks warrants the very largest of toppings and materials, so I didn’t start out with that, but I’d rather start with double-winged version of the Akroyd. The fly is tied with gut-sub, and is fully gutted, so I *could* take it for a swing next year…. I’ll just have to remember a helmet before I do so.

Akroyd on Flypattern.org:

Traherne: Nepenthian

One author that I hadn’t tied anything from was Traherne: the gaudy patterns, the massive amounts of (rare) feathers and colors everywhere made me stop shy of actually sitting down to tie anything. But: I needed something fresh to tie, something to tie up that I hadn’t done before, and when I stumbled upon a post in Chasing Silver Magazine I figured I was up for the challenge today.

Learning patterns and styles is important, so to get cracking on Traherne I got out a #5/0 iron and got out some substitute feathers to tie a fishing version of the Nepenthian. There are things to pick on, but it is a fly that I’ll use for fishing, so that is the focus when I tie these. Until 2019 though… I’ll get out the splitcane and put it on the end of a long floating line!