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William Blacker: Standard Flies 25. The Brown Bear

Tail: Mallard, two fibers
Body: Cinnamon brown mohair
Legs: Cinnamon
Wing: Woodcock wing

The Brown Bear from The Art of Angling by William Blacker. The one above is tied in hand on a vintage blind-eye hook, while the three below all are tied for fishing on Ahrex FW580 #10.

The body and hackle could be more of a cinnamon color, but without the dye I chose a brown mohair and legs for this pattern. The woodcock wings gives a overall good balance to this pattern, one I really like, and will bring with me as a allround searching-pattern.

William Blacker: Standard Flies 23. The Evening Moth

Body: Cream-colored mohair
Hackle: Same color as body
Wing: Owl’s wing

The Evening Moth from The Art of Angling by William Blacker. The one above is tied in hand on a vintage blind-eye hook, while the three below all are tied for fishing on Ahrex FW580 #10.

Here is a fly where most is just tied in the spirit of the original pattern: the body is cream-colored sealsfurn, the wing is norwegian grouse in winter-colors, with hackle to match the wing, not the body.

William Blacker: Standard Flies 22. The Little Gosling

Body: Yellow green mohair
Legs: Red or cinnamon
Wing: Starling or bunting wing

The Little Gosling from The Art of Angling by William Blacker. The one above is tied in hand on a vintage blind-eye hook, while the three below all are tied for fishing on Ahrex FW580 #10.

Don’t mistake the “red” as what you would choose today on a modern pattern when a red hackle is used: use a brown-colored hackle, this is what was meant with red back then.

William Blacker: Standard Flies 21. The Black Ant

Body: Black mohair
Hackle: Black
Wing: Water-hen wing, or woodcock

The Black Ant from The Art of Angling by William Blacker. The one above is tied in hand on a vintage blind-eye hook, while the three below all are tied for fishing on Ahrex FW580 #10.

Another easy and simple pattern that have stood its time since the days of Blacker: A black and fly, fished wet.